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Musashi XX

Magazine

UpdateApril 5, 2019
ReleaseSeptember 10, 2018

Near Tokyo, you can see many names of stations and areas with “musashi” at the beginning, such as “Musashi XX.” Let’s learn some interesting facts and things about Musashi.

The Origin of Musashi

Tokyo, except for the islands, most of Saitama, and part of Kanagawa Prefecture used to be included in Musashi-no-kuni (Musashi Province) according to the administrative boundaries that existed until about 150 years ago. The names of areas and stations, such as Musashi-murayama, Musashi-urawa, and Musashikosugi, all derive from Musashi Province. Incidentally, Edo (now Tokyo) was part of this province.

Station Names with “Musashi”

There are 21 stations in and around Tokyo with “Musashi” in its name. Musashi Province was also sometimes called “Bushu” (“warrior province”). There are also five stations with “bushu” in its name (not including freight stations).

Station Names with “Musashi”

Tokyo

Musashi-Sakai (JR Chuo Line, Seibu Tamagawa Line)
Musashi-Koganei (JR Chuo Line)
Musashi-Hikida (JR Itsukaichi Line)
Musashi-Masuko (JR Itsukaichi Line)
Musashi-Itsukaichi (JR Itsukaichi Line)
Musashi-Seki (Seibu Shinjuku Line)
Musashi-Yamato (Seibu Tamako Line)
Musashi-Sunagawa (Seibu Haijima Line)
Musashinodai (Keio Line)
Musahi-koyama (Tokyu Meguro Line)
Musashi-nitta (Tokyu Tamagawa Line)
Kanagawa
Musashi-Kosugi (JR Nambu / Yokosuka / Shonan-Shinjuku Line, Tokyu Toyoko Line)
Musashi-Nakahara (JR Nambu Line)
Musashi-Shinjo (JR Nambu Line)
Musashi-Mizonokuchi (JR Nambu Line)
Musashi-Shiraishi (JR Tsurumi Line)

Kanagawa

Musashi-Kosugi (JR Nambu / Yokosuka / Shonan-Shinjuku Line, Tokyu Toyoko Line)
Musashi-Nakahara (JR Nambu Line)
Musashi-Shinjo (JR Nambu Line)
Musashi-Mizonokuchi (JR Nambu Line)
Musashi-Shiraishi (JR Tsurumi Line)

Saitama

Musashi-Urawa (JR Saikyo / Musashino Line)
Musashi-Takahagi (JR Kawagoe Line)
Musashi-Fujisawa (Seibu Ikebukuro Line)
Musashi- Yokote (Seibu Chichibu Line)
Musashi-ranzan (Tobu Tojo Line)

Station Names with “Bushu”

Saitama

Bushu-Araki (Chichibu Railway)
Bushu-nagase (Tobu Ogose Line)
Bushu-karasawa (Tobu Ogose Line)
Bushu-Nakagawa (Chichibu Railway)
Bushu-Hino (Chichibu Railway)

Town of Musashi-Kosugi

Details of Selected Musashi XX Stations

Musashi-koyama Station

This station is on the Tokyu Meguro Line. It was called “Koyama Station” at the time of opening but changed to the current name since there was already “Oyama Station,” which has a different pronunciation but the same Chinese characters. Near the station, there is an 800-meter long arcaded shopping street, Musashi Koyama Shotengai Palm. There is a yakitori shop, where you can buy yakitori and eat it there, a koppe-pan (bread rolls) bakery, and a cafe serving a huge parfait with a height of 60 cm. Enjoy strolling – and snacking – around!

Musashi Koyama Shotengai Palm

Pan-no-Tajima

Thick Ham Cutlet (350 yen)

Toriyu

Yakitori (160 yen per skewer)

Musashi-Koganei Station

This station is on the JR Chuo Line. According to one conjecture, it is said that “Musashi” was added to the name to avoid confusion because there was already a Koganei Station in Tochigi Prefecture and Shin-Koganei Station on the Seibu Tamagawa Line. Near the station, there is Koganei Park, which is famous as a place for viewing cherry blossoms as well as various wild birds, such as Japanese tits and Japanese pygmy woodpeckers, all year round. Inside the park stands the Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum, where historical buildings were brought in from other places, restored to the original state, preserved and displayed.

Kodakara-yu Public Bathhouse (Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum)

Kodakara-yu Public Bathhouse (Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum)

Koganei Park
Tokyo Metropolitan Park Association

Koganei Park
Tokyo Metropolitan Park Association

Musashi-Itsukaichi Station

The terminal station on the JR Itsukaichi Line. It is the nearest station to Akigawa Valley, where you can enjoy BBQ, camping, walking, and onsen (with accommodation facilities). In front of the station, there is Tokyo Ura-yama Base, which offers temporary luggage storage, pay shower booths, rental cycles, and a cafe space, and various guide tour services.

Akigawa Valley

Akigawa Valley

Seoto-no-Yu Spa at Akigawa Valley

写真提供:東京裏山ベース(www.ura-yama.com/

Photos courtesy of Tokyo Ura-yama Base(www.ura-yama.com/

Photos courtesy of Tokyo Ura-yama Base(www.ura-yama.com/

Bits of Knowledge Related to “Musashi”

Ryogoku Bridge

It is said that this bridge is called “Ryogoku,” which means “both countries,” because Ryogoku Bridge on the Sumida River was then connecting two kuni (provinces), Musashi-no-kuni and Shimousa-no-kuni (Shimousa Province)*. Wide streets were created around both sides of the bridge and the area was said to be always crowded with people, as it was once Edo’s most popular entertainment quarter.

Shinsen Edo Meisho Ryogoku noryo hanabi no zu / Ichiryusai Hiroshige
Photos courtesy of National Diet Library Digital Collections

*The east side of the Sumida River used to belong to Shimousa Province before becoming part of Musashi Province in the Edo period.

TOKYO SKYTREE℠

The height of TOKYO SKYTREE℠, 634 meters, was decided according to the pronunciation of the characters comprising “musashi” of Musashi Province (mu is 6, sa is 3, and shi is 4). Thus, you can see how the word “musashi” is deeply familiar to Japanese people.
©TOKYO-SKYTREETOWN
TOKYO SKYTREE℠

 

*The information herein is as of September 2018.